• 0
  • 0
  • 0
  • 1
  • Embed Code

Indian Folk Tales: How The Coconut Came To Myanmar

Myanmar, which was earlier known as Burma, is also known as the land of swaying coconut trees. In the Myanmar language, the coconut trees were known as the 'gon bin,' which in English means the mischief-maker’s tree.

There is a very interesting story behind this name. Once upon a time, centuries ago, a raft landed at the coast of Burma.The raft was carrying three people. On their arrival, they were at once taken to the king. On questioning them, the king found out that they were banished from their kingdom as a punishment for the crimes committed by them.

The king asked them individually about the crime that they had committed. The first man said that he was a thief and stole valuables from rich people. The second one was a woman and she said that she was a witch who used to cast wicked spells on people to scare them. The third said that he was a mischief-maker, who did nothing except for harming people by telling lies.

The king heard all three of them very patiently. After that, he gave orders for the thief and the witch to be given a thousand pieces of silver coins

each and allowed them to live in Burma. However, he ordered the mischief-maker to be hung immediately.

The courtiers were astonished by the king’s orders.The king explained that the thief stole from people because he had no money and was poor. The same was true for the witch; she too was poor and unhappy, so she scared people out of frustration. Both of them would make good subjects if they were treated nicely. But the mischief-maker had no reason as such. "Once a mischief-maker, always a mischief-maker," the king said.

As per the king's order, the mischief-maker was beheaded immediately. The next day, one of the king’s courtiers was crossing the place where the mischief-maker was executed. Suddenly, he saw the mischief-maker’s head with an open mouth. After going closer, he realized that the head was actually speaking. The head said to the man,"Ask your king to come and bow in front of me, else I won’t spare him."

The courtier immediately ran to the king and narrated the scary event to him.The king did not believe him and thought that he was joking. The courtier

requested the king,"Your majesty, please send someone with me, so that he can confirm what I have just witnessed."

The king did as the courtier said. Only this time the head was silent. When the second courtier reported this to the king, he became very angry and ordered that the first courtier be executed as he had lied to the king.

The courtier was immediately executed. On seeing the execution, the head laughed out loud, and said, "He he! Though I am dead, I can still make mischief." The officers who witnessed this, informed the king about the same. The king was filled with guilt and sorrow.

The king finally ordered for the mischief-maker's head to be buried deep underground, as he was worried that it could create more mischief otherwise.

A few days later, a tree grew in the place where the head was buried.The tree had a most unusual looking fruit, which bore a striking resemblance to the mischief-maker’s head.
The Burmese named this tree as Gon-bin.

If you shake a coconut fruit,you can hear a gurgling sound of water. It feels as if the mischief-maker’s head

still wants to make more mischief through his tittle-tattle.

Previous Article
Next Article

Indian Folk Tales: How The Coconut Came To Myanmar

Indian Folk Tales | 3-12 yrs | Reading Pod

Myanmar, which was earlier known as Burma, is also known as the land of swaying coconut trees. In the Myanmar language, the coconut trees were known as the ‘gon bin,’ which in English means the mischief-maker’s tree.

There is a very interesting story behind this ......


Myanmar, which was earlier known as Burma, is also known as the land of swaying coconut trees. In the Myanmar language, the coconut trees were known as the ‘gon bin,’ which in English means the mischief-maker’s tree.

There is a very interesting story behind this name. Once upon a time, centuries ago, a raft landed at the coast of Burma.The raft was carrying three people. On their arrival, they were at once taken to the king. On questioning them, the king found out that they were banished from their kingdom as a punishment for the crimes committed by them.

The king asked them individually about the crime that they had committed. The first man said that he was a thief and stole valuables from rich people. The second one was a woman and she said that she was a witch who used to cast wicked spells on people to scare them. The third said that he was a mischief-maker, who did nothing except for harming people by telling lies.

The king heard all three of them very patiently. After that, he gave orders for the thief and the witch to be given a thousand pieces of silver coins each and allowed them to live in Burma. However, he ordered the mischief-maker to be hung immediately.

The courtiers were astonished by the king’s orders.The king explained that the thief stole from people because he had no money and was poor. The same was true for the witch; she too was poor and unhappy, so she scared people out of frustration. Both of them would make good subjects if they were treated nicely. But the mischief-maker had no reason as such. “Once a mischief-maker, always a mischief-maker,” the king said.

As per the king’s order, the mischief-maker was beheaded immediately. The next day, one of the king’s courtiers was crossing the place where the mischief-maker was executed. Suddenly, he saw the mischief-maker’s head with an open mouth. After going closer, he realized that the head was actually speaking. The head said to the man,”Ask your king to come and bow in front of me, else I won’t spare him.”

The courtier immediately ran to the king and narrated the scary event to him.The king did not believe him and thought that he was joking. The courtier requested the king,”Your majesty, please send someone with me, so that he can confirm what I have just witnessed.”

The king did as the courtier said. Only this time the head was silent. When the second courtier reported this to the king, he became very angry and ordered that the first courtier be executed as he had lied to the king.

The courtier was immediately executed. On seeing the execution, the head laughed out loud, and said, “He he! Though I am dead, I can still make mischief.” The officers who witnessed this, informed the king about the same. The king was filled with guilt and sorrow.

The king finally ordered for the mischief-maker’s head to be buried deep underground, as he was worried that it could create more mischief otherwise.

A few days later, a tree grew in the place where the head was buried.The tree had a most unusual looking fruit, which bore a striking resemblance to the mischief-maker’s head.
The Burmese named this tree as Gon-bin.

If you shake a coconut fruit,you can hear a gurgling sound of water. It feels as if the mischief-maker’s head still wants to make more mischief through his tittle-tattle.

For more interesting Indian Folk Tales for kids, go to : Indian Folk Tales

For other interesting stories for kids, browse though our huge collection of short stories here : Stories for Kids

LEAVE A REPLY